In The News

Jamaica Plain Gazette   |  May 27, 2011   |  By Rebeca Oliveira
Casey team revises traffic projections MassDOT reports new projections for traffic on the Casey Overpass that may affect upcoming design debate.
Smart Growth America   |  May 20, 2011   |  By Wendy Landman
WalkBoston: Good Walking is Good Business WalkBoston, Massachusetts’ main pedestrian advocacy organization, is working to reach beyond active transportation and smart growth partners to recruit allies in the retail, employer and real estate worlds to promote walkable communities. WalkBoston’s latest publication, Good Walking is Good Business (PDF), presents a wide array of research that shows how walking benefits many elements of the economy. Read More
Washington Monthly   |  Jan 12, 2010   |  By Chris Leinberger and Patrick Doherty
The Next Real Estate Boom: How Housing (yes, housing) can Turn the Economy Around Chris Leinberger and Patrick Doherty make the case to rewrite national policies to encourage the construction of walkable urban places. The demand for residences in mixed-use walkable neighborhoods is growing while demand for McMansions has slowed. They also suggest taht this is a great opportunity to get the real estate industry back to work and could help bring an end to the Great Recession. Read More
CEOs for Cities   |  Aug 1, 2009   |  By Joe Cortright
Walking the Walk: How Walkability Raises Home Values in U.S. Cities More than just a pleasant amenity, the walkability of cities translates directly into increases in home values. Homes located in more walkable neighborhoods—those with a mix of common daily shopping and social destinations within a short distance—command a price premium over otherwise similar homes in less walkable areas. Read More
Victoria Policy Institute   |  Dec 7, 1999   |  By Todd Litman
Traffic Calming Benefits, Costs and Equity Impacts This paper describes a framework for evaluating traffic calming programs. Potential benefits include road safety, increased comfort and mobility for non-motorized travel, reduced environmental impacts, increased neighborhood interaction, and increased property values. Traffic calming can help create more livable communities and reduce suburban sprawl. Traffic calming costs can include project expenses, liability claims, vehicle delay, traffic spillover, problems for emergency and service vehicles, driver frustration, and problems for bicyclists and visually impaired pedestrians. Read More

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