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Tag: maps

Boston: Outer Neighborhoods Maps

Boston: Outer Neighborhoods Maps

One of the many benefits of walking is that you see and experience things you’d miss using other modes of travel. And the best way to enjoy them is with a WalkBoston map.

Our maps feature places that are wonderful to walk, easy to navigate, and convenient to get around. Each one is created by those know the territory best – people who live there or are expert in a walk’s particular theme or topic.

Each has a self-guided walk with a detailed route, distances and descriptions of sights and scenes. Download one or all of them from this site, or join WalkBoston and request the maps you want – printed on heavy paper in our distinctive colors. Or join us on one of our guided walks.

These maps explore the neighborhoods of Dorchester, Jamaica Plain, Hyde Park, Roslindale, and Roxbury–all south of Boston’s urban core.

Click on a push pin to get a link to the local map, and then go take a walk!


Click for “WalkBoston – Boston’s Outer Neighborhoods Walking Map” and more maps on Google Maps

Boston: Southwest Corridor Park Walking Map

Boston: Southwest Corridor Park Walking Map

The Southwest Corridor Park was almost a highway. On this walk you can see what happened when the expressway plan was dropped, the narrow corridor became transit lines, and a park was built around it.

The never-built Southwest Expressway would have continued I-95 from Route 128 to downtown Boston, replacing the commuter and Amtrak rail line embankment. Hundreds of businesses and homes between Forest Hills and the South End were demolished in the 1960s to prepare for the new highway. As demolition progressed, however, community residents and activists lobbied in protest. Governor Francis Sargent reexamined the issue and announced his decision in 1972: no road. Funding set aside for I-95 was transferred to public transportation, the first such transfer in the country. The Orange Line–then an elevated line on Washington Street–was relocated into the underground rail corridor.


Click for “WalkBoston’s Boston: Southwest Corridor Park Walking Map” on Google Maps

Boston: Savin Hill Walking Map

Boston: Savin Hill Walking Map

Savin Hill sits serenely above a tangle of teeming transportation arteries. The neighborhood offers a delightful jumble of residential architectural styles lining streets that circle the hill to the park at its very top. Here you can enjoy views of the sea, downtown Boston, the peninsula of UMass Boston and the JFK Library—as well as its own ocean beach and two yacht clubs.

The neighborhood dates to 1630, when Puritans built a temporary settlement for about 140 people on what they called Rock Hill. By the 1800s the arrival of railroad transportation transformed Savin Hill. These new arteries first connected the area to Boston; it became one of the city’s first suburbs. Yet ironically, they also isolated it.

Cut off from the ocean in the early 1930s and from the surrounding urban area in the 1950s, Savin Hill became an increasingly identifiable neighborhood. Still, being cut off from the outside world has enhanced rather than detracted from its neighborly feeling and livability.


Click for “WalkBoston’s Savin Hill Walking Map” on Google Maps

Boston: Harborwalk Map

Boston: Harborwalk Map

Bostonians have always had a love-hate relationship with Boston Harbor and the waterfront. We alternately embrace it and shun it; thrive on its wealth and beauty and then pollute and isolate it. But the bond remains.

Over the past 30 years we’ve started to better appreciate the treasure in our backyard. the wharves are being reborn to lure people back, along with the allure of the aquarium, restaurants, housing, and hotels. The Harbor Islands, forgotten treasures, have been rediscovered. In the past ten years pollution has been cut to a fraction of its former levels. And of course the Central Artery has been replaced with parkland, re-knitting the city and the waterfront. To see it all, there’s the Harborwalk, hugging the water’s edge along much of the waterfront, offering views of the harbor up close.

Click for “WalkBoston’s Harborwalk Map” on Google Maps

Boston: Downtown Development Shaping our streetscapes Walking Map (2008 Edition)

Boston: Downtown Development Shaping our streetscapes Walking Map (2008 Edition)

WalkBoston explores events and projects that affect the pedestrian environment. Here we spotlight projects in Downtown Boston lying between Government Center, the Waterfront, South Station and Park Square. In this area—less than a square mile—20 large-scale projects have been proposed. All will change and enliven the Downtown pedestrian environment. WalkBoston plays an important role ensuring walker-friendly/safe designs and has an impressive record of getting cities, towns, state agencies, developers, institutions, and elected officials to recognize and accommodate the needs of walkers. Every additional member helps our message be heard.

Click for “Downtown Development Shaping Out Streetscapes Walking Map” PDF